And So It Continues: Uma Thurman’s Face

Image courtesy of dailymail.com

“Is that you, Uma Thurman?”, “Has Uma Thurman had work done?”, “Has Uma pulled a Renee on us?”, “Uma Thurman unrecognisable at premier.”, “What has happened to Uma Thurman’s face?”

Why? Whhhyyyyy do we care??? Because I’ve gotta be honest – I don’t! I don’t care! So what if someone somewhere on this huge planet of ours has decided to do something different with their face? Why does that matter? How does that impact our lives?? Why am I writing about the same thing again??

In case you missed it, it seems that actress Uma Thurman has attended a premiere wearing substantially less eye makeup than she ordinarily does. The world went into frenzy mode for a good 12 hours I’d say. It was trending on Facebook and Twitter. Inane post after inane post after inane post.

Isn’t it a little sick and twisted that, time after time, Thurman has stepped out with multiple products slathered on her face layer after layer and we don’t bat an eyelid, but when she wears less makeup and probably looks more like how she would look naturally (as in: THE FACE SHE WAS BORN WITH, HEAVEN FORBID), all hell breaks loose and people are saying they can barely recognise her?

This is a classic example that shows us just how deeply this appearance-obsessed culture runs within our society. Wearing makeup, changing the way you look, perfecting your face, covering flaws and accentuating other features, is expected of women by society in general – I’m not just talking celebrities, here, though they certainly get the brunt of it. What they experience from the media has filtered down to all women, everywhere. This message that you must put on a mask before you step out that door.

And now it’s got to the point where we can claim to barely recognise someone WITHOUT their makeup on. How sad is that? So I say good on Uma Thurman. Good on her for doing what she wanted to do. Some people are speculating (OF COURSE) that she has had plastic surgery because her forehead was “suspiciously smooth” and she didn’t smile. I’m leaning more towards it being due to a simple lack of eye makeup, but if it turns out she has had surgery, that’s her choice. Why she, or anyone, would feel that would be the right choice to make is the issue we should be focusing on. The constant, immense pressure bearing down on women to look flawless and avoid aging (on a related note, have you seen this?) is leading some to take what I would say are pretty drastic measures (i.e. going under the knife) to achieve what is a virtually impossible goal set by society. Let’s examine that issue instead, please.

What do you think about it all?

birdandfox

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4 comments

  1. Amy B

    Nix the photoshop first- I don't care what women do to their faces (or bodies) as long as it's portrayed accurately and honestly! Your body = your right to drown it in makeup, plump, bump, nip or tuck as you see fit.

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  2. birdandfox

    I agree, Photoshop is a huge problem. Luckily *some* magazines have started to understand that people don't actually want to see a fake photo of someone but there's still a long way to go! Thanks for the comment, Amy 🙂

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  3. Isabel

    I think a lot about these things, birdandfox. Why do women wear make up (myself included, every now and then)? Why do women remove hair from their legs and arm pits? Why do women get married and change their names? Why is my surname my Dad's surname, and was his Dad's surname? These seemingly 'small' things affect our lives and the fabric of our society. Yes, we are obsessed with how women look. It's not good. Uma should do what she damn well likes. But she can't – well, she CAN, but the media pounce on her and it becomes a story. So sad.

    Have you read Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg? If not you definitely should. It hit home in many ways, particularly around how we all need to be way less judgmental of each other – especially women of other women! I don't have all the answers, but it's good to analyse these issues (of which the Uma thing is a tiny part) and try to work out a better way x thanks for the thought provoking post!

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  4. birdandfox

    I'm so glad I'm not the only one who thinks these types of questions, Isabel! I've recently become more and more critical of everything really, but in particular, my own use of make up. I've been wondering what's at the bottom of why I use it – why I started to way back in high school, why I continue to use it, etc. I've been considering writing a blog post about it actually. So…watch this space…potentially.

    We really are obsessed with women's appearances as a society, aren't we? It hits me every so often when I come across tabloids in the shops and I just think what a ridiculous state the world is in when Kim Kardashian's weight is worthy of a headline or, hell, even worth WRITING about! Frustrates me greatly.

    No, I haven't read it but it is on my "to read" list! I've heard so many good things about it and it seems to be becoming a core read in the feminist genre. If it's talking about women being less bitchy towards each other then I can certainly get on board with that!

    And I agree, this example that the whole Uma fuss provides us is just one teeny tiny part of a much bigger, widespread problem. I think if we can chip away at each part, bit by bit, we might get there slowly.

    Thanks for your comment, Isabel! I love having these types of discussions – might have to write more of these types of posts in the future! x

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